le gran luxe

my name is charles

putthison:

The Man Who Believed in Simplicity

Although I own more clothes than I need, and think there are a number of advantages to having a big wardrobe, there’s something admittedly appealing about personal uniforms. The idea that one can put a lot of thought into what they buy, but almost no thought into what they choose to wear … because it’s always the same thing. Such simplicity feels freeing.

Jean-Michel Frank seems to have known this idea well. He unfortunately lived a short life – having committed suicide at age 46 – but in his brief time, he became one of the most influential interior designers of the 20th century. A pioneer in minimalism, he was known for his plain-lined but sumptuous furniture made from luxurious materials such as mother-of-pearl, shagreen, mica, and leather. For example, here’s a striking oakwood armchair upholstered in doe-hide that he designed for a hotel in Patagonia (his work was famous among wealthy elites in Argentina, who would often visit Paris, where Frank was based). He also designed a special collection for Hermes in 1924, which was recently re-released by the French luxury house. Included was a club chair made from sheepskin, a rye-straw marquetry screen, and a parchment covered dressing table. You can see other designs by Frank at artnet.

This idea of simplicity was extended to his wardrobe. Frank was said to have owned forty of the same exact grey flannel suit. Each was double-breasted with a four-on-two buttoning configuration (four buttons, two for closing), and made with a long peak lapel line and no ticket pocket (for the sake of simplicity, we can assume). The lapels were cut relatively straight, rather than curved with a belly. The chest was clean, the shoulders soft, and the upper arms a touch full. The result was a silhouette that allowed Frank to look relaxed and comfortable, but also gave him a great elegance.   

In a 1938 issue of Harper’s Bazaar, Frank was quoted as saying, “Throw out and keep throwing out. Elegance means elimination.” He seems to have done this in both his work and wardrobe, paring things down to their most essential forms, and making sure that what was done, was done exceptionally well. I’ll admit, the idea of wearing the same thing every day isn’t for me, but I also don’t look as good as Frank in a grey flannel double-breasted suit.

The child is father of the man

Once upon a time, a very nice couple whom I didn’t know very well threw some kind of party. I can’t remember what the occasion was, but I do know that they lived in a nice apartment near the Broadway-Lafayette F stop, and that I went to the party with a former boyfriend. It proved to be a memorable evening.

We made small talk with lots of nice people. At some point we found ourselves clustered together with two other couples, at least one component of each was an architect. Some public figure had just come out as gay, and one of the guests said something innocuous about the importance of being true to oneself.

“Oh, I agree,” said one of the women, blandly. “Take my father-in-law, for instance. It wasn’t until he got terminal cancer that he was able to tell the world who he really was.”

“What was that?” said my ex-boyfriend.

“A nineteenth-century baby.” she said. “His true desire had always been to dress in a gown and a bonnet. And when he had his fiftieth college reunion”—here she mentioned an Ivy League university—“he said he wanted to show his classmates who he really was. So my husband wheeled him around in a large pram, and he carried a silver rattle.”

There was a silence.

“Where did you get the pram?” I finally asked.

“Oh,” she said. “We had to get it made.”

We drank in silence.

Sometimes, when I feel tired or dispirited and want to stay home, I remind myself of this incident. Because life is full of wonderful surprises.

From Paris Review

VIA

titanium44

"While being young is an accident of time, youth is a permanent state of mind"

— Frank Lloyd Wright   (via titanium44)

(Source: jemappelleemilie, via titanium44)

neueregel:

Giovanni Michelucci

neueregel:

Giovanni Michelucci

"One of the things that always amuses me — amuses isn’t even the right word, because it doesn’t amuse me — but often, I’m at dinner parties with very close friends, straight, and they realize that Richard and I have been together 24 years, and the response is often, ‘Wow, you guys have been together 24 years! That’s so amazing. I don’t think of gay men being together that long.’ And I’m, like, ‘Why? What are you talking about?’ Some of the longest relationships I know of are same-sex couples. A lot of my straight friends have married and divorced and married and divorced in the time Richard and I have been together. I think that preconception, from even very educated liberal friends, that being gay is possibly more sex-based than emotionally based, is surprising and shocking in today’s world. I’m someone who likes being part of a couple and always wanted that and always sought that, and it would probably be true for me whether I was gay or straight. Richard and I are bound together, and I think that’s what that recognition is when you look someone in the eyes and you feel like you’ve known them forever. It is a kind of coming home."

— Tom Ford

genericarchitecture:

Fontana delle 99 Cannelle

Tancredi da Pentima

[L’Aquila,1272]

genericarchitecture:

one-room office
Francesco Marullo
(Tehran, 2013)

genericarchitecture:

one-room office

Francesco Marullo

(Tehran, 2013)

genericarchitecture:

Project for a tourist resort on the Black Sea
G. Zoundblat
[Atelier Vesnin at Vhutein, Moscow, 1928-1929]

genericarchitecture:

Project for a tourist resort on the Black Sea

G. Zoundblat

[Atelier Vesnin at Vhutein, Moscow, 1928-1929]

genericarchitecture:

Notstalghia (Ностальгия)

Andrei Tarkovsky (written with Tonino Guerra)

[1983]

Domenico on the Capitoline Hill: 

What ancestor speaks in me? I can’t live simultaneously in my head and in my body. That’s why I can’t be just one person. I can feel within myself countless things at once.

There are no great masters left. That’s the real evil of our time. The heart’s path is covered in shadow. We must listen to the voices that seem useless in brains full of long sewage pipes of school wall, tarmac and welfare papers. The buzzing of insects must enter. We must fill the eyes and ears of all of us with things that are the beginning of a great dream. Someone must shout that we’ll build the pyramids. It doesn’t matter if we don’t. We must fuel that wish and stretch the corners of the soul like an endless sheet.

If you want the world to go forward, we must hold hands. We must mix the so-called healthy with the so-called sick. You healthy ones! What does your health mean? The eyes of all mankind are looking at the pit into which we are plunging. Freedom is useless if you don’t have the courage to look us in the eye, to eat, drink and sleep with us! It’s the so-called healthy who have brought the world to the verge of ruin. Man, listen! In you water, fire and then ashes, and the bones in the ashes. The bones and the ashes!

Where am I when I’m not in reality or in my imagination? Here’s my new pact: it must be sunny at night and snowy in August. Great things end. Small things endure. Society must become united again instead of so disjointed. Just look at nature and you’ll see that life is simple. We must go back to where we were, to the point where we took the wrong turn. We must go back to the main foundations of life without dirtying the water. What kind of world is this if a madman tells you you must be ashamed of yourselves!

O Mother! The air is that light thing that moves around your head and becomes clearer when you laugh.

 


 (on the set in Bagno Vignoni)

 

 

genericarchitecture:

Madhya Pradesh Vidhan Sabha

Charles Correa

[Bhopal, India. 1980-1996]